Lineal Border Launch: Day 4

Are we having fun yet or what?

After two days of transitional patterns with subtle color, yesterday we introduced you to the super-bold design of Marching Orders.  Keeping with the theme of modern, bold designs, we have one more.  This pattern has been a huge success already with our Mondrian blog post and rendering from  last February.  Introducing laNeva’s  next Lineal Collection border, which we shall simply call Composition Six.

(If you want an up close and personal view, click on any image)

This is another bold and graphic pattern for laNeva Tile, utilizing the primary colors so common in DeStijl artwork.  DeStijl in Dutch means “The Style” and is the name of the artistic movement that was headed by the famous Piet Mondrian in the early 20th century. This design is as much about the blocks of color as it is about the patterns that are created by the grout lines.

Composition Six is shown here using the following laNeva Solid Colors:

  • 1″x 6″ liner bars and 1″x 2″ Background Color: #31 Snow
  • 1″x 2″ & 2″x 2″ Accent Colors: #68 Twilight, #84 Siren, #73 Butter, #24 Steel
  • 4″x 4″ Accent Colors: #84 Siren, #73 Butter

Finished with a dark gray colored grout.

This border measures approximately 10-1/2″ tall, 3/8″ thick and is sold mesh mounted in 12″ lengths or in a 12″W x 10-1/2″H panel with overglazed (finished) edges.  There is a semi-random repeat using the DeStijl layout concept and these size components shown.

One method to create a completely different look with Composition Six is to use lighter grout for the installation. Alternately, the pattern could be constructed in a more subdued color scheme using  #95 Lichen, #68 Twilight and#92 Mist Crackle, or you can choose any of laNeva’s Solid Color tiles for a personalized creation.

Want to see the first 3 designs in the Lineal Series? Mondays post featured the release of Bamboo Forest. Tuesday we launched Herringbone Classico and Wednesday was the uber-bold, Marching Orders.

And finally, if you want the general skinny on our Lineal Collection, here’s how it works:

laNeva Tile’s “Lineal” border collection is a series of 6 pre-designed, mesh-mounted borders of our most popular patterns. Since you choose the colors and combinations, your border can be as contemporary or traditional as you’d like.

We provide the detailed drawings and the color examples and you personalize the design with our choice of any of our solid color glazes. It’s still a custom design made just for you, but with no pricing surprises and a faster lead time. What’s not to like with that?

Our final two Lineal Collection borders will be featured Friday and Saturday, using our luscious Rift Series tiles.  These will tie into a special product announcement on Monday. Oh, we can’t wait!

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Lineal Border Launch: Day 3

Monday we introduced you to the Lineal Collection of borders and our first design, Bamboo Forest.  Yesterday we featured another transitional design, Herringbone Classico.  Enough of the standards, we’re here today to wow you! Announcing our ultra-mod pattern, Marching Orders.

Graphic in nature, this pattern cries out for bold colors and lots of contrast. The block design, in its full repeat creates an undulating “wave” (1″x1″ tiles up to to 4″x4″ and then back down again) that is not evident at first glance and prevents this baby from getting too square.  Marching Orders is shown here using the following laNeva Solid Colors:

  • 1″ x 6″ horizontal liner bars used at the top & bottom: #31 Snow
  • 1/2″x 6″ horizontal liner bar at the bottom: #24 Steel
  • 1″ x 1″ body: #84 Siren
  • 1″x 1″, 2″x 2″, 3″x 3″ & 4″x 4″  Accent: #31 Snow

Finished with a sand colored grout.

This border measures approximately 9-1/2″ tall, 3/8″ thick and is sold mesh mounted in 12″ lengths.  There is a 24″ pattern repeat on the body of the design.

Unlike yesterday, where we suggested an alternate color scheme to add some pizzaz, today’s alternate should create an option to tone this wild child down a bit. For a more subdued but just as fabulous look, try a random combination of #71 Dune and #90 Oregano (shown below) in place of the red or choose any of laNeva’s Solid Color tiles.

If you didn’t catch yesterday’s release, check out the luxe beauty of Herringbone Classico. Want to see where it all began?  Here is Mondays post, with the release of Bamboo Forest. And finally, if you want the Cliff notes on our Lineal Collection, here’s how it works:

laNeva Tile’s “Lineal” border collection is a series of 6 pre-designed, mesh-mounted borders of our most popular patterns. Since you choose the colors and combinations, your border can be as contemporary or traditional as you’d like.

We provide the detailed drawings and the color examples and you personalize the design with our choice of any of our solid color glazes. It’s still a custom design made just for you, but with no pricing surprises and a faster lead time. What’s not to like with that?

Another Lineal Collection border will be featured tomorrow, and each day this week. Stay tuned. We’re just getting started!

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Lineal Border Launch: Day 2

Yesterday we introduced you to the Lineal Collection of borders and our first design, Bamboo Forest.  We are keeping with the more transitional designs today and featuring another of our widely popular borders, Herringbone Classico.

A bit tongue-in-cheek, this herringbone is thoroughly modern with its impressively-chunky 10″ height and random color layout. Herringbone Classico is shown here using the following laNeva Solid Colors:

  • 1″ x 6″ horizontal liner bars used at the top & bottom: #24 Steel
  • 1″ x 2″ & 1″ x 1″ random tile: #77 Café, #71 Dune

Finished with a sand colored grout.

This border measures approximately 10″ tall, 3/8″ thick and is sold mesh mounted in 12″ lengths.  There is a 4″ pattern repeat on the body of the design, but all colors are randomly placed.

While these neutral colors are quite at home in both a modern loft or more traditional space, for a completely different look (how about Retro!) try a combination of #73 Butter, #77 Café and  #92 Mist Crackle (shown below) or choose any of laNeva’s Solid Color tiles.

If you didn’t catch yesterday’s release, see Bamboo Forest here. If you want the Cliff notes on our Lineal Collection and how it works:

laNeva Tile’s “Lineal” border collection is a series of 6 pre-designed, mesh-mounted borders of our most popular patterns. Since you choose the colors and combinations, your border can be as contemporary or traditional as you’d like.

We provide the detailed drawings and the color examples and you personalize the design with our choice of any of our solid color glazes. It’s still a custom design made just for you, but with no pricing surprises and a faster lead time. What’s not to like with that?

Another Lineal Collection border will be featured tomorrow, and each day this week. Stay tuned. Our border collection is anything but boring!

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Announcing the Lineal Collection Borders

Announcing laNeva’s new pre-designed tile border series!

Our “Lineal” border collection is a series of 6 pre-designed, mesh-mounted borders of our most popular patterns. Since you choose the colors and combinations, your border can be as contemporary or traditional as you’d like.

We provide the detailed drawings and the color examples and you personalize the design with any of our colors you would like. It’s still a custom design made just for you, but with no pricing surprises and a faster lead time. What’s not to like with that?

We will be announcing one of our Lineal borders each day this week with our first, that we are calling “Bamboo Forest”.

Bamboo Forest is named due to its strong vertical nature and tile separations that mimic the horizontal striations in bamboo. It is shown here using the following laNeva Solid Colors:

  • 1″x 6″ horizontal liner bars used at the top & bottom: #68 Twilight
  • 1/2″ x 6″ vertical liner used in the design: #61 Sky
  • 1″x 2″ vertical tile: #92 Mist Crackle

Finished with a sand colored grout.

This border measures approximately 8-1/2″ tall, 3/8″ thick and is sold mesh mounted in 12″ lengths.  There is no pattern repeat, all vertical tiles are randomly placed.

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For a more contemporary look, try this one in a combination of #24 Steel, #95 Lichen and #73 Butter (shown below) or choose any of laNeva’s Solid Color tiles.

Another Lineal Collection border will be featured tomorrow, and each day this week. Stay tuned. Our border collection is anything but boring!

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9 Ways Grout Can Enhance Your Tile Design

If you don’t know Houzz, you should. Check out this Houzz Ideabook where one of our favorite Kitchen & Bath Designers, Paul Anater, has led us on a visual journey of how grout can create unifying effect within a tile design.


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The Dirt – Installation

Want to learn more about the specifics of laNeva tile? You can be-in-the-know about all the dirt (because that is all that clay really is) and behind the scenes stuff.

More about glazes, grout and our clay body later, today is all about installation.

Installation of laNeva Tiles:

We’ve created the perfect system to make install a cinch.

laNeva Artisan Tile offers any of our solid colors, Rift Series and sizes mesh mounted. In fact our tiles can be mesh mounted in sections up to 12″x 12″, numbered and shipped with an installation map of your personalized tile design. This ensures that mesh sections fit together as planned and you get the final design that you desire.

Mesh mounted tiles make installation a snap for your professional tile installer. While we always recommend hiring a professional tile installer to get the most uniform installation and best possible look- our mesh mounting can greatly ease the stress for a do-it-yourselfer as well.

If you really want to install yourselves, it can be done with amazing results. Check out this fantastic owner-installed fireplace of laNeva’s LOOSE #90 Oregano tiles in 2×4, 1×2 and 1×1 sizes. Great job Mr. S!

* We also offer overglazed edges for any outside edge/corner. These were used on the fireplace where the tile overlaps the fire box insert. More info on these specialty pieces to in our post about Glaze and overglazed edges.

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Weekend Creativity Challenge #4

Combinations of Color

This weekend’s creativity challenge is to think of color in various and unusual combinations. Which colors feel good together and which feel dissonant?

The basic color wheel is made up of  three primary colors, three secondary colors and six tertiary colors.  It gets better though:  If you draw a line straight across the wheel, you get complimentary colors that seem to make each other stronger and more vibrant.  Think red and green for example.

In the upper midwest of the United States (and in other geographical areas I am sure) we tend to shy away from color.  I have seen it numerous times in my Interior Design business where a homeowner will “love” color, but yet is only comfortable using vibrant colors in kids room, or when combining as an accent against a more neutral backdrop.

This weeks challenge is to consider some different combinations of color within interiors: orange/blue (complimentary), primary colors, tertiary combinations. Think outside the box and BE CREATIVE! Do you like the following photos?  Why or why not?

Photo from ecohomeresource.com

Photo by Wesley Rose for Elle Decor

Photo by Wesley Rose for Elle Decor

Photo from traditionalhome.com

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Tile Designs Around Town #2

WHAT: Exterior Entryway of a 1960′s modern Apartment Building

TILE USED: 1″x 1″ glass, multi-colored and frosted.

Always on the lookout for interesting tile designs and applications, this is one found on a recent travel adventure. Tucked under a wide entry overhang, this large-scale tile design is an unexpected treat considering the building is a mere 5 units.  Using 8 total colors of glass tile  with a few small areas of surprise contrast, the wall design reminds me of a flat, simplistic version of an avant garde El Lissitzky (Russian Constructivist) painting circa the 1920′s.

That’s my BA in Art History paying off right there…

Well, I am not about to get into an in-depth comparison of the two artists, as they are very different, with incredibly different mediums, but it is a fun comparison nonetheless.  My introduction to the works of El Lissitzky came through an Interior Design Studio class and the discussion of Constructivist Architecture.

What inspires you?  What do you see in your everyday environment that strikes a chord with you? Sometimes people have a hard time recognizing what they like but can easily identify what they DON’T like. Today, you are hereby challenged to look more closely at your everyday environment and find one unexpected art object, pattern, color or complex shape that really appeals to you.

Notes: Click any of the pics for a closer look. Also, I really don’t like using wiki links, but there is some great background info.  If you know of a better source, leave a comment.

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Is it Modern or Contemporary?

What really is the difference between “Modern” and “Contemporary”? Even within the design community these words are often used interchangeably. The truth is the two are inherently different.

A trade resource (ie not available to the general public) from Moen discusses the fundamental differences between the terms “Modern” and “Contemporary” and how knowing the difference/clarifying their clients wants can help a designer’s success:

“Modern isn’t a style. It’s a way of thinking,” says architect Bryan Russell, a partner in the Atlanta-based Dencity Design. He says that modernist designers seek creative solutions for design problems. By contrast, contemporary is just a style and differs from traditional only in looks, he says. A good illustration of this is the traditional Cape Cod house: a simple box with symmetrical windows topped by a gable roof. A contemporary house might replace the gable with a shed roof, or with a flat roof surrounded by a parapet, and lose some of the detailing. But, because it’s basically a distilled version of the traditional home, major elements and proportions remain. Inside, the design will call for the same materials as a traditional, but with less trim and molding.

The modern home might be radically different: a box cantilevered over the top of another box with large corner windows, for example. That’s because the designer is more concerned with views to the outside than with composition. “Modern thinking is based on asking questions about how to solve problems and not necessarily following the tried and true,” says Russell.

Are you modern or contemporary or somewhere on the spectrum in between? To read the Moen article in it’s entirety, click here.

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How I love thee, Schluter Strips!

Schluter strips, a long staple of the commercial floor covering world, are making their way into contemporary residential tile installations.  I am elated!  These little pieces of German engineering are a great accent to floors and walls, in both functional and decorative tile applications.  I used them a few years ago in a custom tile design and couldn’t have been happier with the final result. Alongside all of the mosaic stripes, as well as along each vertical 90 degree angle, we have a small aluminum Schluter strip, in profiles “Deco” along the mosaic stripes and “Jolly” as an edge finishing profile.

While they add complexity to the installation, this was not a simple design from the start. These little strips of metallic glory are the perfect accent to create a very unique contemporary tile project.

You can find more info at www.schluter.com.

While the small mosaic tiles shown here are glass, this design would be fabulous with laNeva’s 1×1′s or 1×2′s. Order them mesh mounted and have your installer cut into 1″ wide strips.  It’s easier than installing them one by one!

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