A Midcentury Vacation Rental -The Kugel Gips House

We wrote a few months ago about the Mod on Cape Cod: Midcentury Modernist Homes on Cape Cod that were being saved and renovated thanks to the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.

Today we were thrilled to see in our email inbox information from a favorite design resource, Remodelista, regarding STAYING at the newly beautified Kugel Gips House in Wellfleet- the very house we featured. It is absolutely stunning, both the building and surroundings, and has made us quite green with envy for such a gorgeous week’s stay.

“The house, which overlooks Northeast Pond on Cape Cod, is available for rent during the summer months (a portion is tax-deductible); in the autumn and spring, artists and scholars can apply for a residency program.” via Remodelista.

There are actually three homes available for rent on the CCMHT site. They are auctioned in week-long blocks via email. Please contact The Cape Cod Modern Home Trust for more information. Please send us pics after your stay there, but we ask that you not rub it in too much!

The Cape Cod Modern Home Trust also accepts donations of furniture and art associated with the Midcentury Modern style, as well as monetary donations and volunteers for research, fundraising, construction, event planning, publicity, graphic design or technical support.

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Is it Modern or Contemporary?

What really is the difference between “Modern” and “Contemporary”? Even within the design community these words are often used interchangeably. The truth is the two are inherently different.

A trade resource (ie not available to the general public) from Moen discusses the fundamental differences between the terms “Modern” and “Contemporary” and how knowing the difference/clarifying their clients wants can help a designer’s success:

“Modern isn’t a style. It’s a way of thinking,” says architect Bryan Russell, a partner in the Atlanta-based Dencity Design. He says that modernist designers seek creative solutions for design problems. By contrast, contemporary is just a style and differs from traditional only in looks, he says. A good illustration of this is the traditional Cape Cod house: a simple box with symmetrical windows topped by a gable roof. A contemporary house might replace the gable with a shed roof, or with a flat roof surrounded by a parapet, and lose some of the detailing. But, because it’s basically a distilled version of the traditional home, major elements and proportions remain. Inside, the design will call for the same materials as a traditional, but with less trim and molding.

The modern home might be radically different: a box cantilevered over the top of another box with large corner windows, for example. That’s because the designer is more concerned with views to the outside than with composition. “Modern thinking is based on asking questions about how to solve problems and not necessarily following the tried and true,” says Russell.

Are you modern or contemporary or somewhere on the spectrum in between? To read the Moen article in it’s entirety, click here.

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How is LaNeva Tile Produced?

LaNeva Artisan Tile is produced when we receive your order. It takes a little longer to get to you than just pulling items off the shelf, but it is worth the wait. We can produce a design perfectly for you using our many unique sizes and colors.

Making handmade tile is a detailed process with many exacting steps:

  • First, the raw clay needs to be rolled out into a precise thickness: Our standard thickness is 3/8″ which is the perfect thickness if you are matching our tiles to stone tiles or many other handmade tiles. It also makes a great thickness for creating drama when used with machine made tile. Order the overglazed edges and you have a great play of height differences….but I digress.
  • After the clay sheet is rolled, the tile shapes are cut for exactly the size, shape and quantity ordered.
  • The raw clay shapes are then moved onto trays and placed on racks to dry. This drying can take up to 10 days.
  • For our larger sizes, once dry, the fragile dried clay is carefully stacked into an electric kiln and fired. This makes the clay body solid and easy to handle. This is called a bisque firing. We do not bisque fire our smaller sizes.
  • After cooling, we paint the glaze colors onto the clay body by hand. In our larger tile sizes, you may see our brush strokes from how we applied the glaze. This is a look that machine made tiles cannot reproduce.
  • Then the tiles have to dry again.
  • After the second drying, the glazed tiles are carefully stacked and fired again at temperatures between 1800-1900 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • The tiles are allowed to cool, removed by hand and examined for quality.

Because LaNeva tiles are handmade, and each tile is a work of art, each tile will have variations in color, shape, and texture.

We then lay the completed tiles out to verify the quantity of the order and mesh mount if needed. All of our tiles are then packed carefully in recycled shipping boxes along with recycled packing materials and sent out to their final destination via UPS. It’s a process that takes us between 4-6 weeks, but we are sure you will be thrilled with the result.

If you have additional questions, check out our FAQ page or contact us at [email protected]

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