SPAN Field Tile Patterns- Squares

Last week we announced our newest collection of field tile patterns called SPAN (to go along with our Lineal & Slice Collections of Borders) and showed you SPAN patterns using laNeva’s rectangular tiles.  Some fun layouts were included with our favorite being the 3 pattern options using our 1×6 liner. Fab-u-lous!

As promised, we are following up with the squares. It’s hip to be square (had to throw that in there!) and we see a huge resurgence in the market for square tiles. So without further delay, we bring to you:

SPAN Collection – Squares

All pattern drawings show one square foot of each layout. For those of you super-savy readers (of which you ALL are!) note that the patterns on the left and right of each tile size are the same with the left shown as a horizontal running bond and the right, vertical.

And a laNeva insider- update for people who read to the end of each post:

Within the coming week, you’ll see a few changes to the laNeva site, with our new collections (including this one) added to the “Our Tiles” tab.  Have questions? Check out the FAQ’s or contact us for more details.  We love to hear from laNeva Tile fans!

XOXOXO,

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The Alternative Tile Layout- Vertical

We’ve linked to Houzz Ideabooks in the past but today we want to share a collection of photos that illustrate our favorite point: You CAN and SHOULD use rectangular tiles vertically!  Here is a beautiful visual collection of vertical tile installations. Choose any of laNeva’s mesh-mounted SPAN field tile patterns, released last week, to achieve the same fresh, dramatic look.

Click the dots or arrows below to scroll through the Houzz Ideabook.  Enjoy!


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Not Another Boring Subway Tile

Subway tile. The rectangular tiles that were common at the turn of the century only to go out of style through the 1950′s-90′s (replaced by squares) are back in a BIG way. You see them everywhere. Kitchens, Bathrooms, traditional and contemporary. Wha-what? Contemporary subway tile? Absolutely.

#1 Vertical Tile/Vertical Running Bond

You’re used to seeing subway tile in the traditional running bond pattern (sometimes called a brick pattern) shown in the photo to the left. One row is laid lengthwise and the next row is offset by a half tile length to create an offset pattern that resembles a brick pattern. Most often in white, it is a classic pattern.

If you’re sick of the standard layout, or just want to consider some fresh new subway tile ideas, consider the following:

#2 Horizontal Tile/Straight Stack


What if you turn traditional running bond pattern 90 degrees right or left? You have a vertical running bond as shown in drawing #1. Traditional, yes but a little edgier and unexpected than the standard horizontal layout. The focus is the strong vertical line that this pattern creates. It is perfect for those transitional spaces or more contemporary spaces in a dramatic color or unusual size tile.

We can go even further as in drawing #2 with a straight stack of subway tile, either vertical or horizontal. This pattern has been done frequently in more commercial setting such as…subway stations! In a restaurant or home, this is a simple way to bring a bit of funk into your space.

#3 Vertical Tile/Horizontal Running Bond

Even lesser known is drawing #3, a unique subway tile layout that is also a running bond pattern. Here the tiles are vertical, while the slightly different offset layout creates a line of strong horizontal banding. This is my favorite of the subway patterns and one that is completely underutilized.

Check our design boards under Design Ideas for more examples of how to use subway tiles in a pattern. laNeva offers two sizes of the traditional “subway” shape tile- in 2″ x 4″ and 3″ x 6″- with lots of different color combinations to fit your life.

laNeva Tile can also be mesh-mounted for your order in any of these stunning patterns. It makes your life (and your installers) simpler with fewer details left to interpretation!

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